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Paul Johnson

Paul Johnson

Director

Paul has been Director of the IFS since January 2011. He is also currently visiting professor in the Department of Economics at University College London. Paul has worked and published extensively on the economics of public policy, with a particular focus on income distribution, public finances, pensions, tax, social security, education and climate change. He was awarded a CBE for services to the social sciences and economics in 2018. As well as a previous period of work at the IFS his career has included spells at HM Treasury, the Department for Education and the FSA. Between 2004 and 2007 he was deputy head of the Government Economic Service. Paul is currently also a member of the committee on climate change and the Banking Standards Board. He was an editor of the Mirrlees Review of the UK tax system.

Reports

Report
The IFS Green Budget 2019, in association with Citi and the Nuffield Foundation, is edited by Carl Emmerson, Christine Farquharson and Paul Johnson, and copy-edited by Judith Payne. The report looks at the issues and challenges facing Chancellor Sajid Javid as he prepares for his first Budget.
Briefing note
This Wednesday the Chancellor will allocate funding to departments for the next financial year, 2020-2021. This departmental spending (DEL) is £375 billion this year.

News and comment

Newspaper article
Setting supposedly binding fiscal rules, missing them, abandoning them and replacing them with something new has become something of a habit.
Newspaper article
But running through some of the major policies announced at Labour party conference "is a belief that if the government wills it, it will happen — and without causing other problems."

Presentations

Presentation
This presentation was given at an IFS briefing following the Spring Statement 2019.
Presentation
These remarks were delivered at the IFS presentation following the Autumn Budget 2018.
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Newspaper article
Setting supposedly binding fiscal rules, missing them, abandoning them and replacing them with something new has become something of a habit.
Report
The IFS Green Budget 2019, in association with Citi and the Nuffield Foundation, is edited by Carl Emmerson, Christine Farquharson and Paul Johnson, and copy-edited by Judith Payne. The report looks at the issues and challenges facing Chancellor Sajid Javid as he prepares for his first Budget.
Press release
The IFS Green Budget 2019, in association with Citi and the Nuffield Foundation, looks at the issues and challenges facing Chancellor Sajid Javid as he prepares for his first Budget and examines tax and spending options ahead of the next election.
Newspaper article
But running through some of the major policies announced at Labour party conference "is a belief that if the government wills it, it will happen — and without causing other problems."
Newspaper article
The era of many retiring in their early sixties on a decent pension will soon be over, and is already over for increasing numbers. Low interest rates are mostly to blame.
Press release
The Chancellor has announced an increase in spending on public services for next year. Day-to-day spending on public services will grow by 4.1%, or around £13.8 billion, between 2019−20 and 2020−21 in real terms.
Briefing note
This Wednesday the Chancellor will allocate funding to departments for the next financial year, 2020-2021. This departmental spending (DEL) is £375 billion this year.
Press release
The Chancellor will need to find a way to fund an extra £5 billion of spending next year, relative to plans published at the Spring Statement, just to avoid cuts to other public services. Increasing spending on other priority areas would require even greater funding.
Newspaper article
The rest of the country may be getting a little worked up about the prorogation of parliament, but it’s another breach with precedent that is worrying me, getting only one week’s notice of the date of the spending review. It will happen on Wednesday, a date announced only last week.
Newspaper article
Frozen thresholds in our tax system "are effectively hidden annual tax rises", writes Paul Johnson. These add up over time "and result in often-hidden changes to the nature of the tax system."