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Paul Johnson

Paul Johnson

Director

Paul has been Director of the IFS since January 2011. He is also currently visiting professor in the Department of Economics at University College London. Paul has worked and published extensively on the economics of public policy, with a particular focus on income distribution, public finances, pensions, tax, social security, education and climate change. He was awarded a CBE for services to the social sciences and economics in 2018. As well as a previous period of work at the IFS his career has included spells at HM Treasury, the Department for Education and the FSA. Between 2004 and 2007 he was deputy head of the Government Economic Service. Paul is currently also a member of the committee on climate change and the Banking Standards Board. He was an editor of the Mirrlees Review of the UK tax system.

Reports

Briefing note
This Saturday (6 April 2019) marks the start of a new tax year. Unlike many other countries, the UK routinely – and sensibly – uprates the cash values of most tax thresholds and benefit rates each year in line with inflation, in order to maintain their real value.
Report
A healthier population is likely to be more economically productive (and to need less spending on healthcare and health-related benefits). A more prosperous society is likely to be healthier.

News and comment

Newspaper article
If the world can get to net zero in the second half of this century we should be able to avoid some of the worst consequences of climate change. The UK should play its part.
Newspaper article
Imran Rasul and Oriana Bandiera share the 2019 Yrjo Jahnsson award - for work that's careful, empirical, relevant, robust and on rather different issues to those you might expect.

Presentations

Presentation
This presentation was given at an IFS briefing following the Spring Statement 2019.
Presentation
These remarks were delivered at the IFS presentation following the Autumn Budget 2018.
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Newspaper article
If the world can get to net zero in the second half of this century we should be able to avoid some of the worst consequences of climate change. The UK should play its part.
Newspaper article
Imran Rasul and Oriana Bandiera share the 2019 Yrjo Jahnsson award - for work that's careful, empirical, relevant, robust and on rather different issues to those you might expect.
Press release
By freezing the thresholds at which child benefit is withdrawn, the personal allowance is withdrawn and the top rate of income tax applies, recent governments have, rather stealthily, increased the tax rates on high earners and the number of people facing high marginal rates of tax.
Briefing note
This Saturday (6 April 2019) marks the start of a new tax year. Unlike many other countries, the UK routinely – and sensibly – uprates the cash values of most tax thresholds and benefit rates each year in line with inflation, in order to maintain their real value.
Newspaper article
We cannot have our cake and eat it. Decisions have consequences, and so does failure to decide. Pretending that there are no consequences won’t make them go away.
Newspaper article
Today, about 1.6 million employees aged 25 and over are paid exactly at the living wage of £7.83 an hour. That's more than three times as many as were on the minimum wage in the early 2000s, soon after it was introduced.
Presentation
This presentation was given at an IFS briefing following the Spring Statement 2019.
Newspaper article
The government spends an astonishing £22 billion a year on housing benefit. That dwarfs spending on the police, on overseas aid and the budgets of many entire government departments.
Newspaper article
The UK Statistics Authority publishes three headline inflation measures every month. One of them "it knows to be wrong", writes Paul Johnson - this has to change.
Newspaper article
The value of the pound has changed a lot over the past three years - making us all a little poorer. Back in December 2015, £1 would buy you about €1.40. Today it will get you nearer €1.14. It has suffered a similar fate against most major currencies, losing about 15% of its value over that ...