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Paul Johnson

Paul Johnson

Director

Paul has been Director of the IFS since January 2011. He is also currently visiting professor in the Department of Economics at University College London. Paul has worked and published extensively on the economics of public policy, with a particular focus on income distribution, public finances, pensions, tax, social security, education and climate change. He was awarded a CBE for services to the social sciences and economics in 2018. As well as a previous period of work at the IFS his career has included spells at HM Treasury, the Department for Education and the FSA. Between 2004 and 2007 he was deputy head of the Government Economic Service. Paul is currently also a member of the committee on climate change and the Banking Standards Board. He was an editor of the Mirrlees Review of the UK tax system.

Reports

Report
A healthier population is likely to be more economically productive (and to need less spending on healthcare and health-related benefits). A more prosperous society is likely to be healthier.
Report
The IFS Green Budget 2018, in association with Citi, ICAEW and the Nuffield Foundation, is edited by Carl Emmerson, Christine Farquharson and Paul Johnson, and copy-edited by Judith Payne. The report looks at the issues and challenges facing Chancellor Philip Hammond as he prepares for his Budget ...

News and comment

Newspaper article
The value of the pound has changed a lot over the past three years - making us all a little poorer. Back in December 2015, £1 would buy you about €1.40. Today it will get you nearer €1.14. It has suffered a similar fate against most major currencies, losing about 15% of its value over that ...
Newspaper article
The present system of local government finance isn’t sustainable. Something is going to have to give.

Presentations

Presentation
These remarks were delivered at the IFS presentation following the Autumn Budget 2018.
Presentation
This was the introductory section at the launch of the IFS Green Budget 2018.
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Newspaper article
The value of the pound has changed a lot over the past three years - making us all a little poorer. Back in December 2015, £1 would buy you about €1.40. Today it will get you nearer €1.14. It has suffered a similar fate against most major currencies, losing about 15% of its value over that ...
Newspaper article
The present system of local government finance isn’t sustainable. Something is going to have to give.
Observation
Since 2000, all households containing a person aged 75 or over have been entitled to receive a free TV licence, paid for by the government. From June 2020 onwards, the government will no longer provide the funds for these free TV licences and the BBC therefore has to decide whether to continue to ...
Video clip
The IFS is launching a major new £2.5 million study of inequality in the UK, funded by the Nuffield Foundation and chaired by Nobel Laureate Professor Sir Angus Deaton.
Newspaper article
There are few concerns older than that with inequality. It's time to do something about it.
Newspaper article
Why do we still risk emitting far too much carbon, ending up with a no-deal Brexit and doing little effectively to tackle inequality?
Newspaper article
There's too much distance between academic research and the work of government. That means there's still plenty of space for organisations like the IFS which can bridge the gap, 50 years after we were founded.
Video clip
This was the introduction to a public economics lecture day presenting IFS work on public economics topics and dsicussing working in economic research in general and at the IFS in particular.
Report
A healthier population is likely to be more economically productive (and to need less spending on healthcare and health-related benefits). A more prosperous society is likely to be healthier.
Newspaper article
The failures of our economic policy in recent decades have not arisen from constraints imposed by the European Union, they have been our own failures.