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Our goal at the Institute for Fiscal Studies is to promote effective economic and social policies by better understanding how policies affect individuals, families, businesses and the government's finances.

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Our second annual report on education spending in England provides measures of spending per student in the early years, schools, further education and higher education back to the early 1990s.
The era of many retiring in their early sixties on a decent pension will soon be over, and is already over for increasing numbers. Low interest rates are mostly to blame.
This coming Sunday is Pensions Awareness Day – an initiative to raise awareness of retirement planning. This observations asks, are people making adequate financial preparations for retirement?
A well known consequence of increasing longevity and an ageing population is the upward pressure it places on health spending. In this observation we look at how medical spending changes at the end of life.

Events

Upcoming event
Date 23 September 2019 | 14:30 - 15:30
Location Hilton Metropole, Brighton
Availablity Places available
The Institute for Fiscal Studies, the Chartered Institute of Taxation and the Institute for Government are organising joint panel discussions at the main party conferences this autumn, looking at the end of austerity and the spending review.
Upcoming event
Date 26 September 2019 | 18:30 - 20:00
Location The Royal Society, London
Availablity Few places remaining
We’re pleased to announce that Professor Pinelopi (Penny) Koujianou Goldberg, Chief Economist of the World Bank Group, will give the 2019 IFS Annual Lecture on the unequal effects of globalisation.
Upcoming event
Date 30 September 2019 | 12:45 - 14:00
Location Midland Hotel, Manchester
Availablity Places available
The Institute for Fiscal Studies, the Chartered Institute of Taxation and the Institute for Government are organising joint panel discussions at the main party conferences this autumn, looking at the end of austerity and the spending review.

Publications and research

On Wednesday, the Chancellor announced an increase in spending on public services for next year. This press release sets out our initial response to the spending review.
The rest of the country may be getting a little worked up about the prorogation of parliament, but it’s another breach with precedent that is worrying me, getting only one week’s notice of the date of the spending review.
This Wednesday the Chancellor will allocate funding to departments for the next financial year, 2020-2021. In this briefing note, researchers argue that the government is set to take big spending decisions with little idea how sustainable they will prove.
Imran Rasul, co-director of the Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, will give the keynote address at the 11th Transatlantic Workshop on the Economics of Crime in Amsterdam on the 26th-27th September.
School spending covers pupils in state-funded schools aged 5–16, as well as pupils aged 16–18 in school sixth forms. In 2018–19, total school spending in England – excluding early years and sixth-form funding – stood at about £44 billion in 2019–20 prices.
The richest members of our society get a lot of attention. Much of the public conversation about economic inequality is concerned with, loosely, the top 1%, how different they are from the rest, how they got to where they are, and what – if anything – policy should do about it.

News and announcements