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Coronavirus and the economy

Our goal at the Institute for Fiscal Studies is to promote effective economic and social policies by better understanding how policies affect individuals, families, businesses and the government's finances.
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In this report, we look at how geographically unequal the UK is, and how these inequalities have changed over the past decades.
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This briefing note provides new evidence on how pay and occupational progression during the crucial early stages of careers have changed over the last few decades.
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This week, we discuss how inheritances are changing and their impact on inequality with James Banks and David Sturrock.
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Reports suggest that the government is planning on introducing new measures to tackle obesity, including a ban on television advertising of food and drink products that are high in fat, sugar or salt before the 9pm watershed. This observation looks at the efficacy of such a policy.

The IFS Deaton Review of Inequality

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This report examines the inheritances that are likely to be received by those living in England who were born in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. We explore the age at which inheritances are likely to be received and the amounts that we expect to be inherited, focusing on key inequalities in each.
How reforms to the pensions provided to public sector employees led to a £17 billion bill to rectify the incompetence of ministers and/or civil servants.
Using a large-scale panel data set, we trace the evolution of incomes and well-being around the entry into ‘solo self-employment’ – that is, running a business without employees.
A lack of transparency over where spending is expected to be lower is contributing to confusion about the overall scale of fiscal support being provided to address coronavirus, as well as the amount that the devolved governments should receive to fund their own measures.
For 2021 and beyond, the UK government faces choices over what to replace European Structural and Investment funding with.
Our initial analysis of the choices that the Chancellor has made as part of the Summer Economic Update.