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Commentary

The Institute publishes a series of 'Observations', which use our research to explain the facts behind topical policy debates. IFS staff also publish articles in a variety of national newspapers, blogs and specialist magazines to help inform the public debate.

For reports and academic publications, see our publications page.

Our press releases and public finance bulletins can be found on our News page.

Latest Observations

Observation
Now is not the time to raise taxes; the economy is still weak and the recovery only just starting. But that time will likely come.
Observation
From today, the first 18-year-olds will be able to access Child Trust Funds (CTFs) set up over a decade ago by Tony Blair’s Labour government. When first announcing the policy, the government pointed to the fact that ‘people without assets are much more likely to have lower earnings and higher ...
Observation
Today’s Government Expenditure and Revenue Scotland (GERS) figures show Scotland’s implicit budget deficit increasing to 8.6% of GDP in 2019-20, around 6 percentage points higher than the UK as a whole, largely reflecting higher government spending. The Covid-19 crisis means that figures for ...

Recent newspaper articles

Newspaper article
There’s a reason that sterling fell in the wake of the Brexit vote and fell again sharply last week as it appeared that our government planned to break international law. The reason is that these events, this pulling back from trusted institutions, relationships and legal norms, will make us ...
Newspaper article
Millions of children will be returning to school this week. For many, it will be the first time that they have been in five months. The consequences of this loss of schooling will be profound, persistent and socially unjust.
Newspaper article
You cannot fairly assign grades to a cohort of students who have not done the exams. A Levels "didn’t need to be this much of a mess", writes Paul Johnson.