Follow us
Publications Commentary Research People Events News Resources and Videos About IFS
Home Publications Working Paper

Working Paper

Our working papers include policy-relevant material intended for academic publication. The series is edited by Pedro Carneiro and Ian Preston.

ISSN: 1742-0415

IFS Working Paper W20/11
We examine changes in inequality in socio-emotional skills very early in life in two British cohorts born 30 years apart.
IFS Working Paper W20/10
The extent to which like-with like marry is particularly important for inequality as well as for the outcomes of children that result from the union.
IFS Working Paper W20/9
Many governments are considering expanding childcare subsidies to increase the labour force participation of parents (especially mothers) with young children.
IFS Working Paper W20/8
Soda taxes aim to reduce excessive sugar consumption.
IFS Working Paper W20/7
Nearly one-quarter of married, fertile-age women in Sub-Saharan Africa say that they want to avoid pregnancy but are not using contraceptives.
IFS Working Paper W20/6
Individuals may be poor even if their household is not poor, because the intra-household distribution of resources may be unequal.
IFS Working Paper W20/5
We examine how the effects of incentivizing individuals to use healthcare depend on the capacity of the health system.
IFS Working Paper W20/4
Gabriella Conti, Stavros Poupakis, Malte Sandner and Sören Kliem
Home visiting programs constitute an important policy to support vulnerable families with young children. They mainly aim to improve infant-parent relationships, however evidence on their effectiveness based on observational measures is relatively scarce.
IFS Working Paper W20/2
Household borrowing and spending rise with house prices, particularly for leveraged households, but household spending is not consumption.
IFS Working Paper W20/3
We examine the channels through which a randomized early childhood intervention in Colombia led to significant gains in cognitive and socio-emotional skills among a sample of disavantaged children aged 12 to 24 months at baseline.