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Newspaper articles

Articles in newspapers and magazines written by IFS staff.
Newspaper article
By the time the coronavirus lockdown ends, the government's choices "will be utterly different" to when it took office, writes Paul Johnson. "How it makes those choices could prove even more important than the immediate response to the crisis."
Newspaper article
The differences between UK regions are rooted in history going back decades, even centuries. Having fundamental effects on them will require reallocating capital spending for sure, and a whole lot more.
Newspaper article
"Doing a degree on average adds significantly to earnings over a lifetime", Paul Johnson writes. But still, "we do not have an education and training system that provides...routes into good employment for enough young people."
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"If we want more spending, we’ll have to pay for it. That, eventually, must mean more taxes." Paul Johnson surveys Rishi Sunak's choices ahead of the 2020 Budget.
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I see nothing objectionable in fixing a limit to what anyone may acquire by mere favour of others, without any exercise of his faculties, and in requiring that if he desires any further accession of fortune, he shall work for it.” That, from John Stuart Mill, alongside his conviction that great ...
Newspaper article
If there’s one thing that everyone in politics seems to agree on, it’s that we need to solve the housing crisis. But there "really aren’t easy solutions here."
Newspaper article
Last week the Royal Statistical Society announced its statistic of the year. And we at the Institute for Fiscal Studies won. We won for 58 per cent. That’s the proportion of people in poverty in Britain who live in households that contain someone in paid work.
Newspaper article
With a working majority it looks like we’ll have something approaching a full five-year parliament. Beyond “getting Brexit done” Boris Johnson, his chancellor Sajid Javid and the rest of the cabinet will have plenty on their plate to fill the time.
Newspaper article
The three main political parties offer voters starkly different choices on tax, writes Stuart Adam of the IFS.
Newspaper article
The big picture also rings alarm bells. After their 2015 and 2017 election victories, the Conservatives spent a lot more than promised in their manifestos — in many ways, an odd electoral strategy to under-promise and over-deliver on spending, whilst over-promising and under-delivering on deficit ...