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Sonya Krutikova

Sonya Krutikova

Deputy Research Director

Education

PhD Economics: "Schooling and Beyond: Essays on Skill Formation and Learning in Deprived Contexts", University of Oxford, 2011
MSc Economics for Development, University of Oxford, 2007
BA Economics and Quantitative Methods, University of Sussex, 2003

Sonya joined the IFS in February 2014 as Director of the Centre for the Evaluation of Development Policies (EDePo). Her main research interests are in the determinants of skill acquisition among children and young people living in poverty, as well as more broadly the mechanisms through which childhood conditions manifest in child development and outcomes. Her recent work focuses on the role of home and school factors in explaining the evolution of gaps in cognitive skills and school attainment among children from poorer and better off backgrounds in developing countries. Sonya is additionally involved with on-going research in the following areas: the effects of early childhood health, poverty and maternal well-being on health and cognitive development; measurement of development in specific cognitive domains in large-scale surveys; and evaluation of nutrition supplementation and cognitive stimulation programs targeting young children and/or their mothers in a number of contexts including Colombia and Nepal.

( 47 results found )
Observation
A special Issue of Fiscal Studies published today by Wiley on behalf of the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) provides new analysis of the evolution of mortality levels and socio-economic inequalities in 11 OECD countries, including England, over the last 20-30 years.
Press release
Data from a new survey, conducted between 23 February and 2 March, provides some of the first evidence on how parents view the scale of the challenge of lost learning. It shows that, while 9 in 10 parents are happy to send children back to school on Monday, there are big concerns remaining over ...
Briefing note
On 8 March, all pupils in England will return to in-person schooling after what is hopefully the final period of COVID-related blanket school closures.
Press release
The emerging consensus to prioritise school reopenings is welcome. But how the return to school is managed is just as important as when. An optional return risks widening the gaps between disadvantaged students and their better-off peers. And even if the return to school is compulsory and soon, we ...
IFS Working Paper W21/4
This report analyses how these differences in school reopenings affected the learning experiences of English school children. To examine this, we leverage a unique panel of data, allowing us to observe how learning changed between April/May and June/July for around 650 school-aged children in ...
Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 41, Issue 3
This paper combines novel data on the time use, home‐learning practices and economic circumstances of families with children during the COVID‐19 lockdown with pre‐lockdown data from the UK Time Use Survey to characterise the time use of children and how it changed during lockdown, and to ...
IFS Working Paper W20/36
Michael P Keane, Sonya Krutikova and Timothy Neal
This working paper studies the impact of child work on cognitive development in four Low- and Middle-Income Countries. We advance the literature by using cognitive test scores collected regardless of school attendance.
Report
The COVID-19 school closures forced children and parents to make unprecedented changes to their daily routines. Including the summer holidays, most children will have had a five-and-a-half-month break from physically attending school by the time they returned in September.
External publication
A socially mobile country provides equal opportunities for everyone, across big cities and small towns, and regardless of whether your parents are rich or poor. This report makes use of newly linked administrative data on all state-educated pupils born between 1986 and 1988 to follow a group of ...
Observation
In this observation, we use data from an online survey of parents with school-aged children – funded by the Nuffield Foundation and collected during June and July 2020 – to document the patchwork of in-person schooling that children had before the summer. We also explore parents’ concerns ...