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Sonya Krutikova

Sonya Krutikova

Deputy Research Director

Education

PhD Economics: "Schooling and Beyond: Essays on Skill Formation and Learning in Deprived Contexts", University of Oxford, 2011
MSc Economics for Development, University of Oxford, 2007
BA Economics and Quantitative Methods, University of Sussex, 2003

Sonya joined the IFS in February 2014 as Director of the Centre for the Evaluation of Development Policies (EDePo). Her main research interests are in the determinants of skill acquisition among children and young people living in poverty, as well as more broadly the mechanisms through which childhood conditions manifest in child development and outcomes. Her recent work focuses on the role of home and school factors in explaining the evolution of gaps in cognitive skills and school attainment among children from poorer and better off backgrounds in developing countries. Sonya is additionally involved with on-going research in the following areas: the effects of early childhood health, poverty and maternal well-being on health and cognitive development; measurement of development in specific cognitive domains in large-scale surveys; and evaluation of nutrition supplementation and cognitive stimulation programs targeting young children and/or their mothers in a number of contexts including Colombia and Nepal.

( 35 results found )
Journal article
COVID-19 has uprooted many aspects of parents’ daily routines, from their jobs to their childcare arrangements.
Journal article | Journal of the European Economic Association
This paper uses a dataset from Tanzania with information on consumption, income and income shocks within and across family networks.
Mimeo
Orazio Attanasio, Bet Caeyers, Sarah Cattan, Lina Cardona Sosa, Sonya Krutikova, Peter Leighton, Salifu Amadu and Mubarik Yakubu
This report presents the main findings of the project “Improving early childhood development in rural Ghana through scalable low-cost community-run play schemes''.
Press release
School closures, massive rates of job loss and furloughing, and a shift to working from home are all affecting how parents spend their time, and how mothers and fathers divide responsibilities for paid work, housework and childcare.
Briefing note
The COVID-19 crisis has caused drastic changes to most parents’ work lives and other responsibilities. Millions of adults have lost or are forecast to lose their jobs permanently; many more have stopped work temporarily. Others are newly working from home, while many key workers are experiencing ...
Press release
A specially-designed online survey of over 4,000 parents in England between 29 April and 12 May shows that children from better-off households are spending 30% more time each day on educational activities than are children from the poorest fifth of households.
Briefing note
On the 20th March 2020, UK schools closed their gates to all but the children of essential workers and those deemed most vulnerable. As of 15 May, this remained the case; should the progress of the pandemic permit, some more children might be allowed to return at the start of June.
Briefing note
The coronavirus pandemic, and the measures put in place to combat it, have changed almost everything about how people live their day-to-day lives. More than ever before, life today is being conducted behind the nation’s front doors.
Journal article
Global access to preschool has increased dramatically yet preschool quality is often poor.
IFS Working Paper WP19/23
Global access to preschool has increased dramatically yet preschool quality is often poor. We use a randomized controlled trial to evaluate two approaches to improving the quality of Colombian preschools.