Follow us
Publications Commentary Research People Events News Resources and Videos About IFS
Home People Lorraine Dearden
Lorraine Dearden

Lorraine Dearden

Research Fellow

Education

PhD Economics, University College London, 1995
MSc Economics, London School of Economics, 1991
LLB, Australian National University, 1986
Bachelor Economics (Hons.), Australian National University, 1983

Lorraine is a Research Fellow in the Education Sector at the IFS and is also Professor of Economics and Social Statistics in the Department of Social Science, University College London. Lorraine joined the IFS in 1992 as its first Ph.D. research scholar and became a full time member of the research staff in January 1995. She has studied at University College London, the London School of Economics and Australian National University.

Her research focuses on the impact of education and training on labour market outcomes and company performance; evaluation of education and labour market policies; impact of month of birth on childhood and adult outcomes; income support for students; the evaluation of childcare, home learning environment and early years policies on children's and parents' outcomes; ethnic inequality and discrimination; the determinants of the demand for different types of schooling; wage determination and the labour market; higher education funding issues; intergenerational income and education mobility; and programme evaluation issues and methods.

Lorraine is currently involved in the Administrative Data Research Centre – England which involves researchers from the IFS, UCL, LSHTM and Southampton University. She was Director of the ESRC's National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM), PEPA (Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis) NODE based at the IFS and is Deputy Director of the Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) which involves researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and the Institute of Education; and is. She is an elected fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences (2009) and an IZA Fellow.

 

Academic outputs

Journal article | International Journal of Epidemiology
Early exposure to adversity, such as abuse or neglect, is associated with poorer outcomes across social, education and health domains.
IFS Working Paper W16/06
This paper uses tax and student loan administrative data to measure how the earnings of English graduates around 10 years into the labour market vary with gender, institution attended, subject and socioeconomic background.

Reports and comment

Report
It is well known that the average graduate earns more than non graduates, and that university graduates from certain subjects and from certain universities earn considerably more than others. For example, five years after graduation, men from the highest earnings universities earn almost 50% more ...
Briefing note
It is well known that the average graduate earns more than non graduates, and that university graduates from certain subjects and from certain universities earn considerably more than others. For example, five years after graduation, men from the highest earnings universities earn almost 50% more ...

Presentations

Presentation
This presentation was given by Anna Vignoles, Lorraine Dearden, Claire Crawford, and John Micklewright at the event "Family background and university success" on 5 December 2016.
Presentation
This presentation was given today by Professor Lorraine Dearden (Institute of Education and IFS) at the Nuffield Foundation.