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Jack Britton

Jack Britton

Senior Research Economist

Education

PhD Economics, University of Bristol, 2014
MSc Economics (Distinction), University of Bristol, 2010
BSc Mathematics, Imperial College London, 2008

Jack joined the IFS in 2013 and works in the Education and Skills sector. His main interests lie in human capital accumulation and discrete choice dynamic modelling. Jack's recent work has included analysis of the effect of replacing the EMA with the 16-19 Bursary in England on participation and attainment, measuring human capital of university graduates in England, and modelling the interaction between health and human capital.

Academic outputs

IFS Working Paper W19/04
Income contingent loans are an increasingly popular tool for funding higher education. These loans have desirable features, but also potentially high overall government write-offs in the long run. This latter fact has been well documented, but little is known about how those write-offs vary by ...
Journal article | Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics
Graduates from higher income families (with median income of around £77,000) have average earnings which are 20% higher than those from lower income families (with median income of around £26,000). Once we condition on institution and subject choices, this premium roughly halves, to around 10%.

Reports and comment

Report
Education spending is the second-largest element of public service spending in the UK behind health, representing about £91 billion in 2018–19 in today’s prices or about 4.2% of national income.
Observation
The Augar Review – released yesterday – was wide reaching in its scope. Most importantly, the review suggests an important raft of changes to the further education sector and increases the power and scope of the post-18 education regulator, the Office for Students (as we discussed yesterday ). ...

Presentations

Presentation
IFS researchers presented the key findings from their second annual report on education spending in England, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, providing consistent measures of day-to-day spending per pupil in England across the four main stages of education stretching back to the early 1990s.
Presentation
Jack Britton gave a public talk on the topic of "Is it fair to charge £9,250 for university tuition fees?" at the University of Manchester.
( 48 results found )
Report
Education spending is the second-largest element of public service spending in the UK behind health, representing about £91 billion in 2018–19 in today’s prices or about 4.2% of national income.
Presentation
IFS researchers presented the key findings from their second annual report on education spending in England, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, providing consistent measures of day-to-day spending per pupil in England across the four main stages of education stretching back to the early 1990s.
Press release
The extra £4.3 billion just committed for schools in England by 2022 will just about reverse the cuts of 8% in spending per pupil since 2009. Even so, an effective 13-year real-terms freeze will still represent an unprecedented period without growth.
Observation
The Augar Review – released yesterday – was wide reaching in its scope. Most importantly, the review suggests an important raft of changes to the further education sector and increases the power and scope of the post-18 education regulator, the Office for Students (as we discussed yesterday ). ...
Observation
The Augar Review of Post-18 education is the first comprehensive review of both the Further Education (FE) and Higher Education (HE) sectors and has been eagerly awaited. This note provides our immediate reaction.
Presentation
Jack Britton gave a public talk on the topic of "Is it fair to charge £9,250 for university tuition fees?" at the University of Manchester.
Press release
Chris Belfield, Jack Britton, Neil Shephard and Laura van der Erve
The current system of funding undergraduate education means that costs to government are highest for subjects where graduates earn the least, and lowest for subjects where they earn the most. This is an unintended consequence of the English loan-based system, which costs taxpayers about £9 billion ...
IFS Working Paper W19/04
Jack Britton, Neil Shephard and Laura van der Erve
Income contingent loans are an increasingly popular tool for funding higher education. These loans have desirable features, but also potentially high overall government write-offs in the long run. This latter fact has been well documented, but little is known about how those write-offs vary by ...
Briefing note
Jack Britton, Laura van der Erve, Neil Shephard and Chris Belfield
This work estimates how government spending is distributed by subject studied and university attended, based on grants and unrepaid student loans (including both tuition and maintenance loans).
Journal article | Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics
Graduates from higher income families (with median income of around £77,000) have average earnings which are 20% higher than those from lower income families (with median income of around £26,000). Once we condition on institution and subject choices, this premium roughly halves, to around 10%.