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Richard Disney

Richard Disney

Research Fellow

Education

MA African Studies, University of Sussex, 1972
BA Economics, University of Cambridge, 1971

Richard is a Research Fellow at the IFS. He is also a Part-time Professor of Economics at the University of Sussex and Visiting Professor of Economics at University College London. Richard has been a Professor of Economics at the University of Nottingham, at Queen Mary, University of London and at the University of Kent at Canterbury. He is a member of the Senior Salary Review Body, having previously been a member of the NHS Pay Review Body and an advisor to Tom Winsor's investigation of police remuneration. His research interests lie largely in the field of applied microeconomics, notably labour market issues, pensions and public spending.

He is also Co-Director of the IFS's DfID-funded Centre for Tax Analysis in Developing Countries (TAXDEV).

Academic outputs

IFS Working Paper W18/09
Since 1995, police forces in England and Wales have obtained the right to raise revenues locally to supplement central government grants in order to fund their activities.
IFS Working Paper W18/03
Firm-level investment paths are commonly characterised by periods of low or zero investment punctuated by large investment ‘spikes’. We document that such spikes are important for understanding firm and aggregate level investment in the UK.

Reports and comment

Briefing note
This briefing note provides background information on the police service in England and Wales. It details recent changes in police numbers and in police funding, and examines some indicators of police performance in the light of these changes. Finally, it considers briefly the Labour Party’s ...
Briefing note
In this briefing note, we examine police officer retention in some detail.

Presentations

Presentation
This presentation was given at a conference organised by the Office of Manpower Economics on 21 September 2017.
Presentation
This presentation was given at a conference organised by the Office of Manpower Economics on 21 September 2017.