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Martin O'Connell

Martin O'Connell

Deputy Research Director

Education

PhD Economics, University College London, 2015
MSc Economics (Distinction), London School of Economics, 2008
MA Financial Economics (1st Class), University of St Andrews, 2007

Martin is Deputy Research Director of IFS, and head of the Industrial Organisation and Demand sector. His research interests include empirical IO, public economics and applied microeconometrics. He joined the IFS in 2008.

Academic outputs

IFS Working Paper W20/37
We study the introduction of a price floor for alcohol that is aimed at correcting for negative consumption externalities. Policy effectiveness depends on whether the measure achieves large reductions in the most socially costly consumption.
IFS Working Paper W20/34
We study consumer spending dynamics during the first infection wave of the COVID-19 pandemic using household scanner data covering fast-moving consumer goods in the United Kingdom.

Reports and comment

Briefing note
The current system of alcohol taxes in the UK is incoherent. The UK’s departure from the European Union offers an opportunity to improve the way that alcohol is taxed, as EU regulations that place constraints on the system of alcohol duties will no longer apply. In this briefing note, we provide ...
Briefing note
In this briefing note, we use comprehensive real-time data on grocery purchases and prices in Great Britain to show how inflation and promotional activity has evolved up until the beginning of August 2020.

Presentations

Presentation
Presentation given at Wellcome Trust seminar.
Presentation
This presentation was given by Martin O'Connell at the Westminster Food & Nutrition Forum Keynote Seminar on 27 April 2017.
( 102 results found )
Press release
The UK government has put out a call for evidence, seeking views on how well the alcohol duty system currently works and how it could be reformed. In new IFS research – funded by the European Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council and published today - we show that minimum ...
IFS Working Paper W20/37
We study the introduction of a price floor for alcohol that is aimed at correcting for negative consumption externalities. Policy effectiveness depends on whether the measure achieves large reductions in the most socially costly consumption.
Briefing note
The current system of alcohol taxes in the UK is incoherent. The UK’s departure from the European Union offers an opportunity to improve the way that alcohol is taxed, as EU regulations that place constraints on the system of alcohol duties will no longer apply. In this briefing note, we provide ...
Briefing note
In this briefing note, we use comprehensive real-time data on grocery purchases and prices in Great Britain to show how inflation and promotional activity has evolved up until the beginning of August 2020.
Press release
This is the main finding in new research – funded by the Nuffield Foundation and the Economic and Social Research Council – by IFS researchers published today. The paper uses real-time data on millions of grocery transactions (covering food, drink, alcohol, toiletries, cleaning products and ...
IFS Working Paper W20/34
We study consumer spending dynamics during the first infection wave of the COVID-19 pandemic using household scanner data covering fast-moving consumer goods in the United Kingdom.
IFS Working Paper W20/33
We use real-time scanner data in Great Britain during the COVID-19 pandemic to investigate the drivers of the inflationary spike at the beginning of lockdown and to quantify the impact of high-frequency changes in shopping behaviours and promotions on inflation measurement.
Journal article | Journal of Public Economics
We characterize inflation dynamics during the Great Lockdown using scanner data covering millions of transactions for fast-moving consumer goods in the United Kingdom. We show that there was a significant and widespread spike in inflation.
Journal article | American Economic Review
Soda taxes aim to reduce excessive sugar consumption. We assess who are most impacted by soda taxes. We estimate demand using micro longitudinal data covering on-the-go purchases, and exploit the panel dimension to estimate individual specific preferences. We relate these preferences and ...
Observation
Reports suggest that the government is planning on introducing new measures to tackle obesity, including a ban on television advertising of food and drink products that are high in fat, sugar or salt before the 9pm watershed.