( 251 results found )
Journal article | Economica
Over the Great Recession, UK households reduced real food expenditure. We show that they were able to maintain the number of calories that they purchased, and the nutritional quality of these calories, by adjusting their shopping behaviour.
Briefing note
In the recent Budget, the Chancellor introduced a tax on the sugar content of soft drinks, citing concerns about childhood obesity. This tax will be introduced in 2018 and will not apply to fruit juices or milk-based drinks. It has followed calls from various bodies for intervention to reduce ...
Observation
In Budget 2016 the Chancellor announced a “soft drinks industry levy” due to take effect from April 2018. The charge will be levied on soft drinks that contain added sugar and is aimed at “help[ing] tackle childhood obesity.” It has followed calls from various bodies for intervention to ...
Presentation
Presentation given at the University of Oslo, Norway and the Central European University, Budapest, Hungary.
Press release
Distilling microeconomics research into direct policy implications will be the focus of a new website developed by researchers at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, University College London, Princeton University, Harvard University, London School of Economics Northwestern University, University of ...
Presentation
This presentation was given by Rachel Griffith as the Royal Economic Society annual lecture on 24 November 2015.
Video clip
Why has obesity risen despite us eating less? Rachel Griffith and Pierre Dubois talk about her work, which showed how the amount of exercise we get from modern life has played a massive role.
IFS Working Paper W15/29
Over the Great Recession UK households reduced real food expenditure. The authors show that they were able to maintain the number of calories that they purchased, and the nutritional quality of these calories, by adjusting their shopping behaviour.
Observation
Productivity is currently the most talked about topic in town, and for good reason. At the end of 2014 UK productivity remained below its pre-recession level and 16% below where it would have been had the pre-recession trend continued. Looking forward, it is only productivity growth that is likely ...