( 251 results found )
Journal article | CESifo Economic Studies
Corrective taxes have been implemented in a number of countries with the aim of addressing growing concern about the rise in obesity- and diet-related diseases. The rationale is that food consumption imposes costs on the consumer in the future that they do not fully take into account at the point ...
Journal article | Quantitative Economics
Paper forthcoming in Quantitative Economics.
Presentation
This presentation was given at the plenary talk at the Association of South European Theorists Annual Conference in Algiers.
Presentation
Presentation given at Wellcome Trust seminar.
Observation
The government has recently consulted on the structure of alcohol taxes. This consultation focuses on two issues: (i) the introduction of a new still cider and perry band that would increase the tax on products below 7.5% ABV, and (ii) the introduction of a new still wine band that would reduce the ...
Mimeo
The government has recently consulted on the structure of alcohol taxes. This consultation focuses on two issues: (i) the introduction of a new still cider and perry band that would increase the tax on products below 7.5% ABV, and (ii) the introduction of a new still wine band that would reduce the ...
External publication
There have been calls for restrictions on junk food advertising to tackle rising rates of obesity around the world. This column examines the likely effect of a ban on potato crisp advertising. Results suggest that the total quantity of crisps sold would fall by around 15% in the presence of a ban, ...
Journal article | Review of Economic Studies
There are growing calls to restrict advertising of junk foods. Whether such a move will improve diet quality will depend on how advertising shifts consumer demands and how firms respond. We study an important and typical junk food market – the potato chips market.
External publication
Governments have long used taxation to correct for the socially costly overconsumption of alcohol, but as the external cost of overconsumption varies across drinkers, a single tax rate is not optimal. This column argues that variation in preferences for different products and in price ...
Newspaper article
Heavy drinkers have a higher social cost than other drinkers and are more responsive to changes in alcohol prices, say the Institute for Fiscal Studies. So why not raise taxes on the high-strength drinks they most often consume?