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Luke Sibieta

Luke Sibieta

Research Fellow

Education

MSc Economics (Distinction), University College London, 2008

BSc Economics (1st Class), London School of Economics, 2005

Luke is a Research Fellow attached to the Education, Employment and Evaluation sector. His general research interests include education policy, political economy and poverty and inequality. In the recent past, he has conducted research into the following specific areas: school funding; the impact of the home learning environment on child outcomes; trends in top incomes; trends in child poverty and income inequality; and the politics of tax policy.

Academic outputs

Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 36, No. 3, September 2015
This article looks at School Spending in England 2010–15.
IFS Working Paper W15/10
School funding per pupil increased substantially between 1999-00 and 2012-13 in England. In this paper, we decompose these increases in funding per pupil into the amount explained by quantities of different types of staff per pupil, their price and changes in non-staffing costs.

Reports and comment

Report
Education spending is the second-largest element of public service spending in the UK behind health, representing about £91 billion in 2018–19 in today’s prices or about 4.2% of national income.
Observation
Almost all the candidates in the Conservative leadership election have promised higher levels of spending on education. With a Spending Review of some form due this year, we analyse the cost of potential commitments on schools and education spending.

Presentations

Presentation
IFS researchers presented the key findings from their second annual report on education spending in England, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, providing consistent measures of day-to-day spending per pupil in England across the four main stages of education stretching back to the early 1990s.
Presentation
Presentation at the launch event for our annual Education Spending in England report, held at One Great George Street.
( 182 results found )
Report
Education spending is the second-largest element of public service spending in the UK behind health, representing about £91 billion in 2018–19 in today’s prices or about 4.2% of national income.
Presentation
IFS researchers presented the key findings from their second annual report on education spending in England, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, providing consistent measures of day-to-day spending per pupil in England across the four main stages of education stretching back to the early 1990s.
Press release
The extra £4.3 billion just committed for schools in England by 2022 will just about reverse the cuts of 8% in spending per pupil since 2009. Even so, an effective 13-year real-terms freeze will still represent an unprecedented period without growth.
Press release
This evening, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a funding package for schools across England. This package represents a large increase in spending per pupil, taking it back to about the same level it was in 2009-10. However, a 13-year period of no net growth in school spending per pupil, after ...
Book chapter
School spending covers pupils in state-funded schools aged 5–16, as well as pupils aged 16–18 in school sixth forms. In 2018–19, total school spending in England – excluding early years and sixth-form funding – stood at about £44 billion in 2019–20 prices.
Observation
Almost all the candidates in the Conservative leadership election have promised higher levels of spending on education. With a Spending Review of some form due this year, we analyse the cost of potential commitments on schools and education spending.
Report
Chris Belfield, Jack Britton, Franz Buscha, Lorraine Dearden, Matt Dickson, Laura van der Erve, Luke Sibieta, Anna Vignoles, Ian Walker and Yu Zhu
This report estimates the impact on earnings of attending HE compared with not going. The authors detail how this varies by subject and institution of study, as well as how these returns vary by gender, prior educational attainment and the sorts of subjects individuals have studied up to age 18. ...
Newspaper article
It's a fact that spending on schools in England is much higher than it was 20 years ago. But that's not the full picture in a country which has seen a population boom coincide with a squeeze on public spending. Spending per pupil is actually lower than it was in 2010 in today's prices - as is the ...
Press release
Chris Belfield, David Goll and Luke Sibieta
Children from poorer backgrounds now have more spent on their education than do those from better-off families.
Briefing note
Chris Belfield, David Goll and Luke Sibieta
Pupils benefit from a large amount of state funding for education in the 12+ years they spend in formal education, about £73,000 on average for pupils aged 16 in Summer 2010 in England. The total amount they experience is shaped by their education choices (e.g. whether to stay on post 16 and/or go ...