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Luke Sibieta

Luke Sibieta

Research Fellow

Education

MSc Economics (Distinction), University College London, 2008

BSc Economics (1st Class), London School of Economics, 2005

Luke is a Research Fellow attached to the Education, Employment and Evaluation sector. His general research interests include education policy, political economy and poverty and inequality. In the recent past, he has conducted research into the following specific areas: school funding; the impact of the home learning environment on child outcomes; trends in top incomes; trends in child poverty and income inequality; and the politics of tax policy.

Academic outputs

Journal article | Fiscal Studies, Volume 36, No. 3, September 2015
This article looks at School Spending in England 2010–15.
IFS Working Paper W15/10
School funding per pupil increased substantially between 1999-00 and 2012-13 in England. In this paper, we decompose these increases in funding per pupil into the amount explained by quantities of different types of staff per pupil, their price and changes in non-staffing costs.

Reports and comment

Briefing note
The response to the coronavirus crisis has underlined the critical role of the UK’s key workers, many of whom are in relatively low-paid sectors. This has prompted calls in outlets as diverse as the Guardian and the Financial Times to reassess the working conditions of key workers, both during ...
Observation
An important part of the UK policy response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been to try to help ensure key workers with children have access to sufficient childcare. Children of key workers are allowed to continue attending school and childcare settings, and both schools and early years providers are ...

Presentations

Presentation
IFS researchers presented the key findings from their second annual report on education spending in England, supported by the Nuffield Foundation, providing consistent measures of day-to-day spending per pupil in England across the four main stages of education stretching back to the early 1990s.
Presentation
Presentation at the launch event for our annual Education Spending in England report, held at One Great George Street.
( 190 results found )
Briefing note
The response to the coronavirus crisis has underlined the critical role of the UK’s key workers, many of whom are in relatively low-paid sectors. This has prompted calls in outlets as diverse as the Guardian and the Financial Times to reassess the working conditions of key workers, both during ...
Press release
There are substantial differences between key workers in different sectors. Policymakers looking to change key workers’ working conditions after the pandemic will need to recognise this.
Observation
An important part of the UK policy response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been to try to help ensure key workers with children have access to sufficient childcare. Children of key workers are allowed to continue attending school and childcare settings, and both schools and early years providers are ...
Observation
In this observation, we set out some of the most important facts about key workers to help inform the evolving policy response to COVID-19.
Observation
What are the main parties’ spending proposals for young people in further education and sixth forms, and for adult education? To what extent will they reverse the cuts we’ve seen to date?
Observation
Here we outline an initial response from IFS researchers on the Conservative party manifesto. We take policy areas by turn but this is not a full assessment.
Observation
Below we outline an initial response from IFS researchers on the Labour manifesto. We take policy areas by turn but this is not a full assessment.
Observation
Below we outline an initial response from IFS researchers on the Liberal Democrat manifesto. We take a number of policy areas by turn but this is not a full assessment.
Press release
The extra £4.3 billion just committed for schools in England by 2022 will just about reverse the cuts of 8% in spending per pupil since 2009. Even so, an effective 13-year real-terms freeze will still represent an unprecedented period without growth.
Report
Education spending is the second-largest element of public service spending in the UK behind health, representing about £91 billion in 2018–19 in today’s prices or about 4.2% of national income.