Orazio Attanasio

Professor Orazio Attanasio

Research Director

Education:

PhD Economics, London School of Economics, 1988

MSc Economics, London School of Economics, 1984

Laurea in Statistical and Economic Sciences (Summa Cum Laude), University of Bologna, 1982

Orazio is Research Director of IFS and one of the Directors of the ESRC Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy (CPP) and co-directs the Centre for the Evaluation of Development Policies (EDePo). He also works in the consumption sector.

 

Orazio is a Professor at University College London, a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), a Senior Fellow at the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development and a Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic and Policy Research. In 2001 he was elected Fellow of the Econometric Society and in 2004 Fellow of the British Academy. He is currently President of the European Economic Association, and is a member of the Council of the Royal Economic Society.

 

After obtaining his PhD at the London School of Economics, Orazio taught at Stanford University and the University of Bologna. He was also a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford and visiting professor at the University of Chicago. He has  been Managing Editor of the Review of Economic Studies, the Journal of the European Economic Association and Quantitative Economics

 

His current research interests focus principally on development economics, household consumption and saving behaviour, risk sharing and inequality.

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Estimating the production function for human capital: results from a randomized controlled trial in Colombia

| Working Paper

We examine the channels through which a randomized early childhood intervention in Colombia led to signi cant gains in cognitive and socio-emotional skills among a sample of disadvantaged children aged 12 to 24 months at baseline. We estimate the determinants of material and time investments in these children and evaluate the im- pact of the treatment on such investments. We then estimate the production functions for cognitive and socio-emotional skills. The e ects of the program can be explained by increases in parental investments, which have strong e ects on outcomes and are complementary to both maternal skills and child's baseline skills.

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