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James Banks

James Banks

Co-Director, CPP

Education

PhD Economics, University College London, 1998

MSc Economics, London School of Economics, 1990

BSc Economics (1st Class), Bristol University, 1988

James is Professor of Economics at the University of Manchester, Senior Research Fellow at IFS where he is Co-Director of the Centre for the Microeconomic Analysis of Public Policy (CPP), and a founding Co-Principal Investigator of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. His research focuses on empirical modelling of individual economic behaviour over the life-cycle. His early work focused on consumption and spending patterns, asset accumulation and pension choices. Subsequently he has worked on broader issues in the economics of ageing, such as health, physical and cognitive functioning and their association with labour market and broader socioeconomic status, and the dynamics of work disability.

Journal articles

Journal article
The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) (Steptoe et al. 2013a) is a multidis- ciplinary panel study that collects a comprehensive array of measures on a representative sample of men and woman aged 50 and over who are living in England. Repeated measures covering health, economics, ...

Working papers

IFS Working Paper WP19/13
Delaying retirement has significant positive effects on the average cognition and physical mobility of women in England, at least in the short run. Exploiting the increase in employment of 60-63 year old women resulting from the increase in the female State Pension Age, we show that working ...
IFS Working Paper NBER Working Paper No. 21980
This paper estimates how much additional work capacity there might be among men and women aged between 55 and 74 in the United Kingdom, given their health, and how this has evolved over the last decade.

Presentations

Presentation
This presentation was given as the IFS annual lecture 2015.
Presentation
Paper given at the 15th Annual Research Conference of De Nederlandsche Bank, Amsterdam