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Redistribution from a lifetime perspective

Previous work looking at living standards and the redistribution achieved by the tax and benefit system has generally been based on snapshot information. A new report, launched at this event, analyses redistribution from a lifetime perspective, showing how this changes our view of what impact the tax and benefit system has and what the implications are for policy design. It addresses questions such as:

  • How effective is the tax and benefit system at reducing income inequality over the lifetime, compared with the standard snapshot approach?
  • How have tax and benefit reforms over the last 40 years affected lifetime inequality?
  • How successfully do measures such as increasing income tax and increasing the generosity of means-tested benefits target the lifetime rich or lifetime poor?

This work is funded by the Nuffield Foundation and co-funded by the European Research Council.


Report

Redistribution from a lifetime perspective
Peter Levell, Barra Roantree and Jonathan Shaw

Press release

More than nine in ten individuals pay more in taxes than they receive in social security over their lifetime

Presentations from the event

Redistribution from a lifetime perspective: background and methodology (pdf)
Jonathan Shaw

Redistribution from a lifetime perspective: current tax and benefit system (pdf)
Peter Levell

Redistribution from a lifetime perspective: historical and hypothetical reforms (pdf)
Barra Roantree

Funded by

Find out more

IFS Working Paper W15/27
This paper investigates how our impression of redistribution undertaken by the tax and benefit system changes when viewed from a lifetime perspective. To do so, the authors simulate lifecycle data designed to be representative of the experiences of the baby-boom cohort, born 1945–54.
Press release
In a single year, 64% of individuals in the UK pay more in taxes than they receive in social security. But most individuals experience considerable change over their lifetimes: for example those not in paid work in one year are often in work in another year. New analysis, published by the Institute ...
Presentation
This presentation was delivered at the 'Redistribution from a lifetime perspective' event held at the Nuffield Foundation on 22nd September 2015.
Presentation
This presentation was delivered at the 'Redistribution from a lifetime perspective' event held at the Nuffield Foundation on 22nd September 2015.
Presentation
This presentation was delivered at the 'Redistribution from a lifetime perspective' event held at the Nuffield Foundation on 22nd September 2015.