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Our goal at the Institute for Fiscal Studies is to promote effective economic and social policies by better understanding how policies affect individuals, families, businesses and the government's finances.
Child with poster paints
Pre-pandemic, local authorities received funding to deliver free childcare places each academic year based on the number of children accessing childcare in January of that year. As a result of the pandemic, funding for the Autumn 2020 term has – unusually – been based on childcare attendance in January 2020 (rather than January 2021). This protected public funding for providers at a time of significantly lower childcare use.
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At this event, we will discuss findings from a new report, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, which sets out the problems with the current tax treatment of business owners’ incomes and investment and discusses how the government could take practical steps towards fixing them.
Exam hall
'Right at the top of the agenda for government should be how to make up this educational deficit created by the pandemic and our response to it — especially for the least advantaged children.' Paul Johnson on learning loss for The Times.
Houses of Parliament
The temporary £20 per week increase in Universal Credit and Working Tax Credit enacted at the start of the pandemic is due to expire at the end of March. Some campaigners have called for it to be extended for another year or made permanent, while the government are said to be considering instead a £500 one off bonus to benefit recipients.

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Events

Upcoming event
Date 26 January 2021 | 14:00 - 15:15
Location Online only
Availablity Places available
At this event, we will discuss findings from a new report, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, which sets out the problems with the current tax treatment of business owners’ incomes and investment and discusses how the government could take practical steps towards fixing them.

Older articles

Despite their important role in research and analysis that influences both corporate and public policy, economists are not very representative of society. This observation looks at interventions which could be taken at younger ages to improve diversity in economics.
In our first episode of 2021, we speak with Nobel Laureate Sir Angus Deaton, Professor of Economics at Princeton University and leading expert on inequality, poverty and welfare.
A year and a half ago we launched the IFS Deaton Review of Inequalities. When we did so, the chair of the Review, Nobel Laureate Sir Angus Deaton, raised the possibility that inequalities may prove a threat to our economic, social and political systems unless they are tackled effectively. Since then, the world has changed more than any of us could have imagined.
'Rishi Sunak will have a host of tough choices and trade-offs to make as he steers the economy and the public finances into calmer waters. At the very least, the chancellor needs to avoid exacerbating these inequities further, as his predecessors often did. That means looking at tax and spending decisions according to how they affect those with wealth, and those without.' Our Director Paul Johnson writes for The Times.
On Thursday, the government set out its plans for council funding in England next year. In this briefing note we examine plans for both core funding and top-ups for ongoing COVID-19 related costs, and look at some of the issues looming beyond next year.
'Life goes on in Whitehall even as the combined crises of COVID and Brexit come to a head. It is to the credit of our system of government and those who work in it that, over the past couple of weeks, the fruits of much labour on the longer-term crisis that is climate change have emerged in the form of three important policy documents.' Paul Johnson writes about the 'necessary' but 'challenging' steps to net zero emissions in The Times.